August202014
“Someday I must read this scholar Everyone. He has written so much~all of it wrong.” Emperor Mage, Tamora Pierce (via fytortall)

(Source: dailyyabookquotes, via fytortall)

5PM

Me in hospital: Eh, I’d only rate my pain sore at a 5, I don’t really need painkillers for this nonsense.

Me with the sniffles: I’ve never been so ill in my life, I feel awful, no person should sneeze this much, this is the worst thing that’s ever happened to me.

3PM
wilwheaton:

A police officer in Kansas City, Mo. is facing internal review after he reportedly posted an inflammatory message on Facebook about the slain Ferguson, Mo. teen whose death has led to mounting chaos.
Televison station KCTV reported on Monday that Kansas City Police Department Officer Marc Catron posted a picture to his Facebook page along with this caption: “I’m sure young Michael Brown is innocent and just misunderstood. I’m sure he is a pillar of the Ferguson community.”
The photo depicted a black man with a wad of money in his mouth, pointing a gun at the camera. But the photo wasn’t of Brown at all. It was of a man in Oregon accused of murder.
Catron also reportedly posted about the violence that has erupted in Ferguson since the fatal police shooting. “Remember how white people rioted after OJ’s acquittal? Me neither,” Catron wrote, according to the television station.
*****
"Facing internal review"? This officer needs to be fired, immediately. Someone who is clearly a racist has no business policing a community.

wilwheaton:

A police officer in Kansas City, Mo. is facing internal review after he reportedly posted an inflammatory message on Facebook about the slain Ferguson, Mo. teen whose death has led to mounting chaos.

Televison station KCTV reported on Monday that Kansas City Police Department Officer Marc Catron posted a picture to his Facebook page along with this caption: “I’m sure young Michael Brown is innocent and just misunderstood. I’m sure he is a pillar of the Ferguson community.”

The photo depicted a black man with a wad of money in his mouth, pointing a gun at the camera. But the photo wasn’t of Brown at all. It was of a man in Oregon accused of murder.

Catron also reportedly posted about the violence that has erupted in Ferguson since the fatal police shooting. “Remember how white people rioted after OJ’s acquittal? Me neither,” Catron wrote, according to the television station.

*****

"Facing internal review"? This officer needs to be fired, immediately. Someone who is clearly a racist has no business policing a community.

2PM

sosuperawesome:

Harrison Cooper paper cuts on Etsy

1PM

the-old-folk-blues said: Why is it that the ethnicity of your characters is so important to visual adaptions when you rarely, if ever, mention it in your prose?

neil-gaiman:

muchymozzarella:

neil-gaiman:

I don’t really understand the question. If the ethnicity of the characters wasn’t in the prose it wouldn’t be mentioned at all in the adaptations and nobody would care. If you are paying attention you will find all sorts of people in the books, with all sorts of backgrounds. 

And it probably came from comics, in which I could have someone drawn as being part of a particular race or ethnicity and then not have to have them talk about being part of that ethnicity, but simply get on with the business of being in the story and behaving as that person, with that point of view, which would include ethnicity, would behave.

It’s important because representation

And also because I was stupid enough to think Fat Charlie was white for the entirety of Anansi Boys until in hindsight I realized what having Anansi for a dad would obviously mean 

Neil may not always say explicitly what the characters’ ethnicities are but he implies them enough, and if you’re paying attention, you’ll be able to figure it out. 

And maybe this is difficult to understand but as someone who’s grown up a bibliophile, who was so bombarded by white characters that I default to Caucasian in my head even when the character is decidedly nonwhite, it’s important to shake off those years of idiotic Western/Caucasian-centricity by portraying characters as other ethnicities.

Exactly.

1PM
cerulean-warbler:

johnskylar:

lisa-maxwell:

kyrafic:

"Never did like that much," is a baller and superb way to express your irritation with the way the patriarchy refuses to acknowledge how badass you are.

Word.

Before World War I, she shot a cigarette out of the mouth of the Kaiser of Germany at his request.
After the war started she sent him a letter asking for another chance, as she was afraid her aim might’ve been a little off.

Annie Fucking Oakley everyone

cerulean-warbler:

johnskylar:

lisa-maxwell:

kyrafic:

"Never did like that much," is a baller and superb way to express your irritation with the way the patriarchy refuses to acknowledge how badass you are.

Word.

Before World War I, she shot a cigarette out of the mouth of the Kaiser of Germany at his request.

After the war started she sent him a letter asking for another chance, as she was afraid her aim might’ve been a little off.

Annie Fucking Oakley everyone

(Source: queenundomiel, via krazykitsune)

1PM
othmeralia:

“I thought unicorns were more … fluffy” 
I think we can all agree with Terry Prachett!  This amazing unicorn is from Edward Topsell’s 1658 edition of the Historie of Foure-footed Beastes.

I love medieval/early modern bestiaries. They are simply fantastic. Completely serious essays discussing the probability of whether unicorns exist or not… How can you not adore this?
"Guys, if people hadn’t claimed a unicorn’s horn was magic, I think we could all probably assume it existed. Now, let’s have a chat about every single one-horned animal that has ever existed."

othmeralia:

“I thought unicorns were more … fluffy”

I think we can all agree with Terry Prachett!  This amazing unicorn is from Edward Topsell’s 1658 edition of the Historie of Foure-footed Beastes.

I love medieval/early modern bestiaries. They are simply fantastic. Completely serious essays discussing the probability of whether unicorns exist or not… How can you not adore this?

"Guys, if people hadn’t claimed a unicorn’s horn was magic, I think we could all probably assume it existed. Now, let’s have a chat about every single one-horned animal that has ever existed."

(via scientificillustration)

3AM
  • rowena: i'm looking over the plans
  • godric: yeah
  • rowena: what's this weird series of rooms accessible only by a hatch in a room on the right hand side of the third floor corridor
  • godric: oh that's for if we ever need to hide a priceless artifact for some reason
  • rowena: why would we hide a priceless artifact in a school
  • godric: safest place
  • rowena: fucking is it though?? there's a giant snake somewhere
  • [in the distance]
  • salazar: there's no snake you are wrong stop being wrong
August192014
theotherjax:

hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible importance, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.
The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”
So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.
There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

In the midst of exploring Renaissance Italy history for reasons, I have found a wonder.

Oh history, you brighten my day almost as much as discovering I finally have enough points to pay for my lunch on my Boots card.

theotherjax:

hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible importance, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.

The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”

So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.

There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

In the midst of exploring Renaissance Italy history for reasons, I have found a wonder.

Oh history, you brighten my day almost as much as discovering I finally have enough points to pay for my lunch on my Boots card.

(via yamino)

4PM
jonomancer:

Brahmagupta, Indian mathematician (598 - 670), known as the “inventor of zero”. Picture from findinsideindia.com.
Brahmagupta was head of the astronomical observatory at Ujjain, a holy city in the Malwa region of central India. (Ujjain has been a center of learning since ancient times, and is known in Hindu tradition as the place where Krishna went to receive his education. The observatory of Ujjain was considered the prime meridian, as Greenwich England is today, making it the baseline for all astronomical observations.)From his observations he deduced that the moon is closer to the earth than the sun is, and that the earth and heavenly bodies are all spheres. His calculation of the length of the solar year is accurate to within about half an hour! But Brahmagupta is best known for his mathematical writings, and especially for developing the concept of zero as a number.In his great work Brahmasphutasiddhanta (“The Opening of the Universe”), Brahmagupta wrote:    When zero is added to a number or subtracted from a number, the number remains unchanged; and a number multiplied by zero becomes zero. Previous schoars had used various symbols as placeholders to show the lack of a number or digit. Brahmagupta was the first to treat zero as a number in its own right, something that could be used in calculations along with other numbers. In doing so, he extended the rules of arithmetic from the natural numbers to what we now call the integers, including zero and negative numbers. Here’s more rules from the Brahmasphutasiddhanta:    A debt minus zero is a debt.    A fortune minus zero is a fortune.    Zero minus zero is a zero.    A debt subtracted from zero is a fortune.    A fortune subtracted from zero is a debt.    The product of zero multiplied by a debt or fortune is zero.    The product of zero multipliedby zero is zero.    The product or quotient of two fortunes is one fortune.    The product or quotient of two debts is one fortune.    The product or quotient of a debt and a fortune is a debt.    The product or quotient of a fortune and a debt is a debt.(“Fortune” and “Debt” were Brahmagupta’s quite descriptive terms for what we’d now call positive and negative numbers.)This is one of those ideas that’s so simple that, from our vantage point centuries later, it’s hard to imagine anyone not understanding it, but people had been struggling along without zero for centuries. It must have taken a stroke of genius to realize that “nothing” is something!But he didn’t stop with negative numbers! The Brahmasphutasiddhanta also contains methods for:- Finding square roots, using an algorithm that Newton would rediscover centuries later!- Solving quadratic equations!- Trigonometry, including tables of sines and cosines!- Summing series of squares and cubes- Finding the area of cyclic quadrilateralsHis work holds up extremely well today. His approximation of Pi was correct to within a few hundredths. About the only place where modern mathematicians would disagree with Brahmagupta is his statement that 0 divided by 0 is 0, where today we leave division by zero undefined.Sources:http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Biographies/Brahmagupta.htmlhttp://www.famous-mathematicians.com/brahmagupta/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmagupta

jonomancer:

Brahmagupta, Indian mathematician (598 - 670), known as the “inventor of zero”. Picture from findinsideindia.com.

Brahmagupta was head of the astronomical observatory at Ujjain, a holy city in the Malwa region of central India. (Ujjain has been a center of learning since ancient times, and is known in Hindu tradition as the place where Krishna went to receive his education. The observatory of Ujjain was considered the prime meridian, as Greenwich England is today, making it the baseline for all astronomical observations.)

From his observations he deduced that the moon is closer to the earth than the sun is, and that the earth and heavenly bodies are all spheres. His calculation of the length of the solar year is accurate to within about half an hour! But Brahmagupta is best known for his mathematical writings, and especially for developing the concept of zero as a number.

In his great work Brahmasphutasiddhanta (“The Opening of the Universe”), Brahmagupta wrote:

    When zero is added to a number or subtracted from a number, the number remains unchanged; and a number multiplied by zero becomes zero.

Previous schoars had used various symbols as placeholders to show the lack of a number or digit. Brahmagupta was the first to treat zero as a number in its own right, something that could be used in calculations along with other numbers. In doing so, he extended the rules of arithmetic from the natural numbers to what we now call the integers, including zero and negative numbers. Here’s more rules from the Brahmasphutasiddhanta:

    A debt minus zero is a debt.
    A fortune minus zero is a fortune.
    Zero minus zero is a zero.
    A debt subtracted from zero is a fortune.
    A fortune subtracted from zero is a debt.
    The product of zero multiplied by a debt or fortune is zero.
    The product of zero multipliedby zero is zero.
    The product or quotient of two fortunes is one fortune.
    The product or quotient of two debts is one fortune.
    The product or quotient of a debt and a fortune is a debt.
    The product or quotient of a fortune and a debt is a debt.

(“Fortune” and “Debt” were Brahmagupta’s quite descriptive terms for what we’d now call positive and negative numbers.)

This is one of those ideas that’s so simple that, from our vantage point centuries later, it’s hard to imagine anyone not understanding it, but people had been struggling along without zero for centuries. It must have taken a stroke of genius to realize that “nothing” is something!

But he didn’t stop with negative numbers! The Brahmasphutasiddhanta also contains methods for:

- Finding square roots, using an algorithm that Newton would rediscover centuries later!
- Solving quadratic equations!
- Trigonometry, including tables of sines and cosines!
- Summing series of squares and cubes
- Finding the area of cyclic quadrilaterals

His work holds up extremely well today. His approximation of Pi was correct to within a few hundredths. About the only place where modern mathematicians would disagree with Brahmagupta is his statement that 0 divided by 0 is 0, where today we leave division by zero undefined.

Sources:
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Biographies/Brahmagupta.html
http://www.famous-mathematicians.com/brahmagupta/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmagupta

4PM

miniaturebee:

Today James came up with the name ‘toodle pipster’ to describe people who are too posh to truly be hipsters but are definitely hipsteresque.

I think it’s magnificent.

4PM
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